Pentagon Set to Increases the Use of Drones

Drone Attack

I for one welcome our new robotic flying overlords!

 

 

The use of drones has become a cornerstone of the military, ranking them right up there with angry drill sergeants and pro wrestlers playing marines on straight-to-DVD movies. Well it looks like the military is about to use a whole lot more of them!

 

Talking about the drones, not more movies of The Marine.

 

The Marine Movies

“Because I think we reached the peak capacity when it comes to those…”

 

On Monday military officials announced that they would be increasing the use of drones by 50% over the next several years. The increase comes after the Air Force had requested a decrease in flying operations/missions from 65 to 60 each day, pointing to stress that missions take on their pilots. The military has even expressed interest in giving out civilian contracts for the use of drones on surveillance missions.

 

Up until recently, drones have been primarily used by the military in either combat operations against suspected terrorists or to collect intelligence over combat zones. Their uses in other operations are suspected to increase over the next few years. Many have commented that the rise in military aggression from Russia and China had a big role in increasing the military’s drone program.

 

Using drones in other combat scenarios wouldn’t be out of the question either. Senior defense officials have commented about the use of both weaponized and non-weaponized drones in war zones like Iraq and Syria, but it’s easy to see how that could get dicey real fast. Considering the outcry some critics have had over the Obama administration’s use of weaponized drones on target targets in Pakistan, Yemen, and Afghanistan; you could imagine why military officials would be going back-and-forth in expanding them to actual war fronts.

 

Monday’s news proves that the Pentagon believe drones to be the future of military intervention. The question of how they will be used, is still anyone’s guess.

 

 

(Photo Credit: Wikipedia, Amazon.com)

 

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